Autism and Constipation

by Paula
(Bakersfield, Ca)

Dealing with Autism and Constipation...


I am raising an autistic child who is a very picky eater.


What types of food could I try to give her to eat or drink to relieve and help her with her constant constipation?


She doesn't like any fruits or vegetable and won't eat them at all. I give her a supplement a few times a week called Miralax but sometimes that isn't enough. She is only 4.


Another question - is chocolate constipating also?






Hi Paula,

Dealing with toddlers and their eating habits can always be difficult, but when you add autism and constipation to the mix , I can understand your challenge.


Still, you need to be as firm as possible about your child's eating habits. A good diet is going to make a world of difference in her health and life for years to come.


Maybe you can find some interesting ways to encourage her to enjoy healthy foods. She doesn't have to love ALL fruits and vegetables, but she needs to discover some that she does enjoy.


Perhaps you can find some clever ways to cut up the fruit and veg to make pictures or designs that she would appeal to her.


Water is very important in dealing with constipation. If you have a hard time getting her to drink plain water, try adding a dash of fresh lemon, fresh lime, slices of cucumber, mint leaves, or something else to give the water a little flavor.


Try to make the water "special" and "exciting" by having a "tea party" or "magic potion."


Does she eat yogurt? Breakfast cereal? You can sprinkle some Salba in her yogurt or cereal and that will help with the constipation.


Salba is a whole food that is full of good essential fatty acids called Omega 3. This really aids in having a regular bowel movement. And the great thing is that Salba is pretty much tasteless.


In fact, you can even bake with Salba and slip it into a recipe quite easily.


Although autism and constipation can be a real challenge, I think you can overcome it with calm patience and a little creativity.


By the way, chocolate doesn't usually constipate most people, but when it comes to constipation, anyone can be sensitive to something in particular that doesn't agree with them. You kind of have to test and do a little trial and error to find out exactly what foods you need to be careful with.


I hope this helps you some and that your child with autism and constipation will be able to get relief and enjoy a more healthy lifestyle.


I've read some interesting material about underlying food allergies, etc., that may contribute to the cause of autism. If you haven't read up on that subject, it may be worth your time and energy.


Blessings,
Angie



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